An Armoire By Any Other Name Is…

For the type of desk, see armoire desk. This an Armoire By Any Other Name Is… needs additional citations for verification.

A wardrobe or armoire is a standing closet used for storing clothes. Throughout the chronological changes in the form of the enclosure, it more or less retained its preset function as a place to retain a king’s robe. The word has gained coinage over successive generations as an independent store for among others, preserving precious items for a ruler like gold, well highlighted in King Edward I’s times. Additionally, an armoire is a wardrobe that is wider than a grown adult’s wingspan, while a wardrobe is smaller. The word wardrobe appeared in the English language in the early 14th century. It originated from Old French words warderobe, wardereube and garderobe, in which “warder” meant “to keep, to guard” and “robe” meant “garment”. The examples and perspective in this section deal primarily with the United States and do not represent a worldwide view of the subject.

In the United States, the wardrobe in its moveable form as an oak “hanging cupboard” dates back to the early 17th century. At that time it was an early export product from America to England, because English woodlands were over-harvested or reserved for the Navy. Walnut succeeded oak as the favourite material for furniture, but hanging wardrobes in walnut appear to have been made very rarely, although clothes presses, with drawers and sliding trays, were frequent. During a large portion of the 18th century the tallboy was much used for storing clothes.

This section does not cite any sources. A common feature was to base future size on the eight small men method. A considered good size double wardrobe would thus be able to hold within its capacity, eight small men. In the nineteenth century the wardrobe began to develop into its modern form, with a hanging cupboard at each side, a press in the upper part of the central portion and drawers below.