Christmas Cake Collection

Enter the characters you see below Sorry, we just need to make sure you’re not a robot. Enter the characters you see below Sorry, we just need to make sure you’re not a robot. Jump to navigation Jump to search For the atomic model, see Plum pudding model. Christmas pudding is a type of pudding traditionally served as part of the Christmas dinner in the UK, Christmas Cake Collection and in other countries where it has been brought by British emigrants.

A traditional bag-boiled Christmas Pudding still showing the “skin”. Many households have their own recipe for Christmas pudding, some handed down through families for generations. Essentially the recipe brings together what traditionally were expensive or luxurious ingredients — notably the sweet spices that are so important in developing its distinctive rich aroma, and usually made with suet. Christmas puddings are often dried out on hooks for weeks prior to serving in order to enhance the flavour.

This pudding has been prepared with a traditional cloth rather than a basin. Prior to the 19th century, the English Christmas pudding was boiled in a pudding cloth, and often represented as round. Initial cooking usually involves steaming for many hours. Most pre-twentieth century recipes assume that the pudding will then be served immediately, but in the second half of the twentieth century, it became more usual to reheat puddings on the day of serving, and recipes changed slightly to allow for maturing. To serve, the pudding is reheated by steaming once more, and dressed with warm brandy which is set alight. An example of a Great Depression era recipe for Christmas pudding can instead be made on Christmas Day rather than weeks before as with a traditional plum pudding, although it is still boiled or steamed. Given the scarce resources available to poorer households during the depression this recipe uses cold tea for flavouring instead of brandy and there are no eggs used in the mixture.

Many families now buy their puddings ready-made from shops and they can be reheated in a microwave oven with a much shorter cooking time. One of the earliest plum pudding recipes is given by Mary Kettilby in her 1714 book A Collection of above Three Hundred Receipts in Cookery, Physick and Surgery. The pudding “had the great merit” of not needing to be cooked in an oven, something “most lower class households did not have”. Throughout the colonial period, the pudding was a symbol of unity throughout the British Empire. Master of the Royal Household, requesting a copy of the recipe used to make the Christmas pudding for the royal family. The King and Queen granted Leo Amery, the head of the EMB, permission to use the recipe in a publication in the following November.

The royal chef, André Cédard, provided the recipe. In order to distribute the recipe, the EMB had to overcome two challenges: size and ingredients. First, the original recipe was measured to serve 40 people, including the entire royal family and their guests. The EMB was challenged to rework the recipe to serve only 8 people. Second, the ingredients used to make the pudding had to be changed to reflect the ideals of the Empire. The origins of each ingredient had to be carefully manipulated to represent each of the Empire’s many colonies. The final recipe included Australian currants, South African stoned raisins, Canadian apples, Jamaican rum, and English Beer, among other ingredients all sourced from somewhere in the Empire.