Christmas Greeting Cards for Colleagues

Enter christmas Greeting Cards for Colleagues characters you see below Sorry, we just need to make sure you’re not a robot. Jump to navigation Jump to search Not to be confused with Thomas Kinkaid. For other people with similar names, see Thomas Kincaid.

American painter of popular realistic, pastoral, and idyllic subjects. William Thomas Kinkade was born on January 19, 1958, in Sacramento County, California. Some of the people who mentored and taught Kinkade prior to college were Charles Bell and Glenn Wessels. Wessels encouraged Kinkade to go to the University of California at Berkeley.

In June 1980, Kinkade spent a summer traveling across the United States with his college friend James Gurney. The two of them finished their journey in New York and secured a contract with Guptill Publications to produce a sketching handbook. The success of the book led them both to Ralph Bakshi Studios where they created background art for the 1983 animated feature film Fire and Ice. While working on the film, Kinkade began to explore the depiction of light and of imagined worlds. After the film, Kinkade earned his living as a painter, selling his originals in galleries throughout California.

Recurring features of Kinkade’s paintings are their glowing highlights and pastel colors. Kinkade said he was placing emphasis on the value of simple pleasures and that his intent was to communicate inspirational, life-affirming messages through his paintings. Kinkade believed he gained his inspiration from his religious beliefs and that his work was intended to contain a larger moral dimension. The passion I have is to capture memories, to evoke the emotional connection we have to an experience. I came out here and stood up on the bleachers and looked around, and I saw all the elements of the track. It was empty at the time.

But I saw the stadium, how the track laid out, the horizon, the skyline of Indianapolis and the Pagoda. I saw it all in my imagination. This is another area that the contemporary art world has a hard time with, that I find interesting. He expresses what he believes and puts that in his art. A Kinkade painting was typically rendered in slightly surreal pastels. Didion went on to compare the “Kinkade Glow” to the luminism of 19th-century painter Albert Bierstadt, who sentimentalized the infamous Donner Pass in his Donner Lake from the Summit. Looking just at the paintings themselves it is obvious that they are technically competent.